Tag - puppy training

Sighthounds, Training Your Young Greyhound or Lurcher Dog

Sighthounds – understanding your dog.

Sighthounds are notoriously independent and will look for any chance to pursue an interesting scent or moving animal.

Because of this, hounds are often perceived as stubborn and impossible to train. The real truth is that hounds just have different motivations than their non-hound peers. When you’re working with a hound, it’s important to understand his innate desires and to incorporate those into his training. There are two distinct subgroups within the hound group: the scent hound and the sight hound (although some exhibit both tendencies). As a group, hounds have an elevated desire to pursue prey, but scent hounds and sight hounds vary in significant ways and each presents distinct training challengers.

A scent hound primarily tracks by using his nose. They are built for endurance rather than for short bursts of speed; he can track using scent even when his prey is out of sight. Certain scent hounds will exhibit deep, booming vocalizations. Scent hounds will often tree or corner prey, and use their big voices to alert a handler to the animal’s whereabouts. Many scent hounds have independent personalities, the result of an inborn tendency to be self-sufficient when working at a distance from their handler.

Scent hounds present some common training challenges. The scent hound is easily distracted, especially by smells, which can make outdoor training difficult.  Some scent hounds are very vocal and may bark and bay for long periods of time, which can cause problems with the neighbours. Scent hounds are also notorious for running after scents and covering great distances without stopping, which makes it almost impossible to let them off leash without extensive training.

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dog obedience

Dog Obedience, Teaching Your Pet Dog Basic Commands

Teach Your Dog Obedience and Commands

Here are the basics commands dogs should be taught for dog obedience
Sit
Down
Stay
Come
Walking on leash

How to teach.

1. Be consistent.
Use the same cue for the same command each time. If you use “come” one week, “come here” the next, and “come here, girl” after that, you will have one confused dog.

2. Start simple and slowly make it harder.
You want to go step-by-step and give your dog lots of practice to get it right. Start with an easy command in a place with no distractions. When your dog is responding consistently, add what trainers call the three D’s: distance, duration, and distractions. Stand a step away from your dog, then two; ask for a one-second stay, then a two-second stay; add a bouncing ball, some treats scattered about.
Wait until your dog has mastered the current challenge before adding a new one. If she fluffs it, just take away one of the challenges and try again, going more slowly this time.

3. Don’t repeat the command.
It’s easy to do, but it teaches your dog that she doesn’t need to respond promptly to the first command.

4. Use food treats as rewards.
There are lots of methods for training, but try using food treats, both as a lure to get your dog where you want her to go and as a reward for obeying. If your dog isn’t that interested in food, try offering verbal praise and no treat, a favourite toy, or a physical reward such as a good behind-the-ears scratch or tummy rub.

5. Time it right.
The praise and reward need to come immediately after the dog does what you want if she’s going to make the connection.

6. Make rewards sporadic, then phase out.
Dogs are motivated by unpredictable rewards. Once your dog gets the idea of what you’re asking her to do, dish out treats only for the best responses–the quickest sit. Then vary the type, amount, and frequency of the reward.

7. Keep it short and sweet.
Training will be most effective if it’s fun and you stop before either of you gets bored. Keep the mood upbeat, not serious, and make the sessions short. Five or ten minutes is plenty to start with, or you can do many mini-training sessions throughout the day, especially if you have a puppy–like kids, they have shorter attention spans.

8. Mix up people and places.
If you want your dog to obey your child, your partner, etc. and to be as bidable in the kitchen as she is in the yard, practice having different people give commands in different areas.

9. Keep your cool.
Yelling, hitting, or jerking your dog around by a leash won’t teach her how to sit or come on request. It will teach her that you’re scary and unpredictable, and that training’s no fun. If you feel your fuse burning short, just end the session and try again later. Fair, calm, consistent training is the best way to get your dog to obey and respect you.  Dog obedience is not only for the good of the dog.

10. Once your dog knows a few commands, practice “Nothing in life is free.”
Always ask your dog to obey a command before you give her a treat, a toy, a meal, a game or walk, a tummy rub, or anything she wants. If she ignores the command, put down the food bowl, the leash, or whatever she’s hoping for, and try again a minute or two later. This helps reinforce your role as the leader of the pack.

11. Keep practicing.
Don’t expect that once your dog has learned something, she’s learned it for life. She can lose her new skills without regular practice.

Bottom line: Basic commands not only teach helpful skills, they reinforce your role as your dog’s leader. Using treats to lure your dog into the correct position or place, and then to reward her for obeying, is one of the easiest and most dog-friendly methods.

Dog obedience benefits everyone.

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Puppy Training to Come When Called Video

Puppy Training to Come When Called

Dylan the puppy learns the first steps of coming to its owner when called, a basic but mandatory cue for any dog. Victoria explains why it’s important to make it a game and not be just boring. She also covers common mistakes that people make when teaching dogs the recall process.

In Teacher’s Pet, Victoria Stilwell shows you how to employ her Positively Method for puppy training the right way, growing your level of communication to strengthen the bond between you and your precious pet.

Have a question for Victoria? She’ll be checking in regularly, so be sure to leave your comments and questions below.

Victoria Stilwell is widely known as a dog trainer, author, and television presenter. She has served as a judge on the CBS show Greatest American Dog and is best known as the host of the Animal Planet dog training TV show It’s Me or the Dog, where she counsels families with problem pets and solves their dogs’ behavior problems. In 2010, she launched Positively, the world’s first global network of hand-picked world-class dog trainers dedicated to providing the public a brand name they can trust in humane, force-free training.

A Happy Pet Owner:
It has given me a whole new set of ways to treat and teach my dog some basic stuff that for sure will make our cohabitation a little happier for all. I learned a lot like how to know the personality of my dog, as the positive and negative reinforcement work and how they affect directly in its development of personality.

 

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