Tag - cute kittens

cat show

Supreme Cat Show at the NEC Birmingham November 2017

The Supreme Cat Show.
Organised every year by the world’s oldest cat registry, the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy, or GCCF, and takes place every November at the NEC Birmingham. Special awards of UK Champion and Supreme Champion can be earned at this show only. A cat wins each show’s “Best In Show” award.

Non-pedigree and pedigree pet cats.
Non-pedigree cats and pedigree pet cats are also permitted to enter the Supreme Cat Show. They can also compete for the same levels of title as the pedigree cats but these are for “Master Cat” titles as opposed to “Champion” and “Premier” ones. They then go on to compete to win the title of Supreme Non-Pedigree or Supreme Pedigree Pet Cat. Classes are also included for kittens, with both non pedigree and pedigree pet kittens competing for the title of Supreme Household Pet Kitten.

Show structure
Unlike other shows, the GCCF’s Supreme Show has no miscellaneous or club classes; it does, however, have classes other shows dont. There are four Adult Open classes for each championship status breed: Champion Male and Female classes for full Champions, the winners being eligible for Grand Challenge Certificates and Pre-Champion Male and Female classes for cats with one or two Certificates, competing for Challenge Certificates. The same applies to the neuter classes which are split into Premier and Pre-Premier classes for males and females.



Cats which are already Grand Champions do not compete in these classes but in special classes for Grand Champions, Imperial Grand Champions, UK Grand Champions and UK & Imperial Grand Champions only, the winner being eligible for a UK Grand Challenge Certificate. Grand Premiers, Imperial Grand Premiers, UK Grand Premiers and UK & Imperial Grand Premiers compete for a UK Grand Premier Certificate. In these classes several breeds may compete together. UK Grand Certificates are only awarded at the Supreme Show; two such Certificates from different judges give the cat the title of UK Grand Champion/Premier or UK & Imperial Grand Champion/Premier if it has additionally gained that title. There is no Reserve UK Grand Challenge/Premier Certificate.

Best of Breed winners at the Supreme Show do not get certificates but compete against the other BOB winners in their section for Best of Variety.

The seven Best of Variety Adults (Persian, Semi-Longhair, British, Foreign, Burmese, Oriental and Siamese) compete for Supreme Adult, the seven kittens for Supreme Kitten and the seven neuters for Supreme Neuter. The Supreme Adult and the Neuter can add the coveted word ‘Supreme’ to their title.

Finally, the Supreme Adult, Supreme Kitten and Supreme Neuter compete against each other for the honour of being judged Supreme Exhibit.

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healthy cats

Healthy Cats: Give Your Cat the Food of Love They Need

Healthy cats need the correct food.

Cats are known as an obligate carnivore. They needs meat and fish, flesh and bone. Cats are NOT vegetarian, It cannot be stressed enough. Your cat needs meat, and feeding her anything else is almost animal cruelty.

If a cats does not get the majority of their nutrition from meat and fish they are going to suffer some serious health problems. The most crucial element is taurine, an amino acid essential to the health of your cat’s heart and eyes, and its immune system. It cannot be synthesised by the body so must be taken in through food, and the highest concentrations of taurine are found in meat and fish. Lack of taurine has been found to have major implications for cat health that it is supplemented in all cat food. Cats deficient in taurine can suffer from heart failure, irreversible blindness from retinal degeneration, fur loss and tooth decay.
Tests have shown that a human vegan will take little or no taurine into their diet, whereas a meat and fish eater can ingest many grammes per day. But simply adding a taurine supplement to a cat’s vegetarian food doesn’t always work. The cat may well not take to the supplement or do very badly on it, plus you still won’t be giving them everything they need nutritionally.

So what should I feed my cat?

COMMON CAT HAZARDS
There are numerous household and garden products we take for granted – but they can kill cats!!
In The Home

Lilies: are lethal to cats and will cause kidney failure. Ingesting even a small amount can be fatal in hours.
Air fresheners: Can cause skin irritation, depression and breathing difficulties in pets.
Cleaning products: Be especially careful with what you put on the floors as cats lick their paws.
Flea treatment for dogs: This is extremely important. Dog flea treatments usually contain permethrin, which could be fatal to cats.
Antifreeze: Cats love the smell, but can seriously harm them. Don’t put it in your garden pond in winter.
Potpourri and cigarette smoke: Should be avoided.

In the garden
Plants: Azaleas, oleanders and yew leaves.
Slug pellets: Use Slug Gone (sluggone.com) sheep wool pellets. They’re organic, smell nice, and are non-poisonous and they work.
Pesticides and weedkillers: Always check the label for pet-friendly products.
Salting paths: Salt in cold weather can cause burns to sensitive paw pads.

What healthy cats need isn’t much different to us, except for the meat intake which they must have. They don’t need added salt and sugar, added cereal content or added colours. BUT this is what a lot of supermarket cat food contains. Some people say cats should only be given dry food because it helps keep their teeth clean. NO. After one cat had  some urinary tract infections a vet recommended to feed it wet food only as cats are prone to dehydration. As for teeth, cats would be better off in the garden chewing on a meaty bone or having a seaweed supplement added to their food (assuming their not suffering with hyperthyroidism – a hormonal glandular disorder mostly found in older cats – where the iodine content should be avoided).

Healthy cats are loving cats.

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Kittens Rescued from River by Fisherman – Video

Kitten Rescue.

When this fisherman went out on the water this weekend, he made an unexpected catch. Jason Frost and his friend Brandon were fishing on the Warrior River in Alabama when they spotted a small kitten racing to their boat. “At first we heard a splash…

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pet photos

Pet Photography – Some Simple Tips for Better Photos

Pet Photography – Achieving better results

If you’re a budding photographer, there’s a strong chance that your pets and those of your friends and family have become a source of inspiration and the subjects of countless experimental photo shoots.

Since animals are very unpredictable and can’t be directed in the same way humans can, getting great pics. of your loyal companions is often easier said than done.

1. Use Treats. This is the simplest trick in the manual! Grab your pets favorite treat or toy and hold it directly above or beside your lens. Without the treat It would be far more difficult to get a good shot.

2. Use Props. New puppies are a little bit more calm, Work with what you have a try different toys until something works.

3. Dress Them Up. Silly as it may be, pets in outfits are eye catching. The more your pets wear them, the less they will mind them.

4. Use the light from windows when taking an indoor photo of your pet, switch off the flash and use natural light. We’ve all seen photos of dogs and cats with scary eyes which are caused by using flash. Turn your flash off for a much nicer image! If you are low on light take your pet nearer to a window. Position your back to the window with your pet in front of you (facing the window).

5. How about posing with your pet. When you are included in the photo with them there will automatically be more personality added, even if your face isn’t in shot. It highlights the family aspect of having a pet. Photos where you are snuggling, playing or sleeping will be treasured memories that you will keep!

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cat

Cat Sounds and Their Interpretations and Meanings

Cat sounds and what they mean

All cats make noises — from meows and purrs to hisses and growls — but some cats are more vocal than others.
Cats communicate with meows, chirrups, hisses, purrs, chatters and growls, but the onomatopoeic meow is the most used.

MEOWS
Kittens will meow to their mums, but as they grow older they typically quit using this sound to communicate with other cats. Often, adult domestic cats that meow do so only when a human is around. This is likely an extension of the way kittens use their plaintive meows as a signal.

PURR
It’s usually assumed that cats make this calming sound when they’re happy, but they purr for other reasons. Purring can signal that a cat feels frightened or threatened and research shows it’s also a type of self-healing.

CHIRRUP
This trilling sound is a cross between a meow and a purr, and many cat owners beleive cats use it as a form of greeting.

GROWL
These rumbling sounds are meant to warn. They can be a response to humans, animals or other cats, and most felines make the noise out of fear, anger or territorial reasons.

CHATTER
This stuttering sound has been described as a combination between a meow and a bleat. It’s typically heard when a pussy spots something,usually a bird or flying insect thats out of reach. It could communicate excitement or frustration.

HISS
A hiss can be loud or soft depending on the cat and the situation it is in. It’s often the cat response to fear and can be directed at cats,other animals, and humans. When a cat is hissing leave it alone!

CATTERWAUL
This shrill and wailing noise is the cry of a cat in heat.

If you have a cat, you can interpret what your pets’ meows and other sounds simply by observing. Look to see what stimulus your cat could be reacting to, and watch its body language — especially its ears and tail — to determine what emotion or message the animal is trying to convey.

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